June Faculty Development: Teaching Digital/E-Professionalism-Reflections for deepening understanding of professional identity on social media

Teaching Digital/E-Professionalism:  Reflections for deepening understanding of professional identity on social media

Nicholas Knowland, TUSM-Maine Track Program, M18

Ensuring the public trust in the medical profession is the reason for promoting professionalism as a key component of medical education. Therefore medical curricula place significant emphasis on the development of professional behaviors.

Digital professionalism, or e-professionalism, describes the increasing interaction of medical professionalism with the greater public through social media outlets. The terms are new but the reality that online images or postings can reflect on students or practitioners has been present for some time and is usually associated with negative connotations.  This has resulted in what some authors have described as a ‘hidden curriculum of digital unprofessionalism’ in which digital unprofessionalism is punished but rarely overtly taught. Despite the consequences that digital unprofessionalism lead to for a clinical student or clinician, the academic literature is increasingly focusing on the positive opportunities associated with professional physician social media use, such as using social media to actively share quality information.

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June Faculty Development: Use of Social Media as a Supplement to Medical Education Curricula

Use of Social Media as a Supplement to Medical Education Curricula by Nate Rogers, MD, Maine track ‘16

Though the majority of medical education literature has studied social media and issues of professionalism in relation to its use, medical professionals are beginning to recognize its potential as a powerful educational tool. Twitter and Facebook represent two of the largest and most widely studied social media platforms in medical education, with healthcare professionals finding creative uses of the apps to enhance learning.

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